What Is the Link Between the Weather and Joint Pain?

Janice CarsonJanice Carson

Joint related pain and problems are caused by a number of different issues. The weather is one that surprises many people.

Whether it’s arthritis, gout, osteoporosis, or just an injury that is bothering you, joint pain comes in a lot of different forms. It’s also something that is worsened by many different things. Over use will increase the pain, for example. So will just waking up in the morning, and arthritis is frequently at its worst in the early morning just after you rise. However, another issue that confronts many sufferers of joint related pain is the weather. It may sound like an old wife’s tell, but what’s going on outside may have an impact on what’s happening inside your joints.

What Is the Link Between the Weather and Joint Pain?

There are a few ways that this has an impact on your joints. The first, and biggest, is pressure. The barometric pressure outside shifts with precipitation, temperature changes, and plenty of other things. And when it does, it will impact your body. Think of it like this. The current level of pressure during a sunny, average day in your area is what your body is used to. It’s also pressing against you, even though you don’t really notice it. That pressure is also pressing against your joints, and in doing so it’s actually keeping inflammation from developing.

But when the barometric pressure drops, there’s less force pressing against your body and your joints. This means there’s less resistance pushing against the potential inflammation. Which, in turn, means that the swelling within your joints will normally increase as the pressure drops, resulting in increased joint pain.

Additionally, temperature changes may have an impact as well. Colder weather will decrease circulation and contribute to increased pain and will also heighten sensitivity in the nerves. This means you’ll feel the pain more intensely than you would otherwise. It’s one more way that your meteorologist’s forecast may tell you what to expect from your joints over the next few days.

Anyone who has suffered from joint trouble for a year or more already knows that things like cold, rain, snow, or even minor shifts in the seasons can all have a big impact on their level of pain. Taking the time to figure out just how to deal with that pain and why it is worsened in certain situations will help you develop better strategies for managing the pain. At the very least, it will help you understand it.